Monthly Archives: September 2018

US and Canada Aircraft Production During WW2

While looking for some good summer history reading, I found the book America's Hundred Thousand: U.S. Production Fighters of World War II. This book covers the production miracle associated with scaling up up the US aircraft industry to supply planes for every front during WW2. Its title refers to the fact that the US produced ~100K fighter aircraft during WW2, which lasted for 44 months for the US (Figure 2). I decided that I would look at the numbers for all forms of aircraft produced by the US during WW2. Fortunately, the Hyperwar website has put the Army Air Forces Statistical Digest online, which gives me easy access to the data. The Digest contains aircraft production data for both the US and Canada. Figure 1 shows the production numbers for the 11 categories of aircraft production listed in the Statistical Digest. In addition to 100K fighter aircraft, there were nearly 200K of other aircraft manufactured as well. Continue reading

 
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Using Excel to Compute Effective Tax Rate

I have been working as a contractor for the last few months and it is now time for me to make a quarterly tax payment to the folks at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). This involves using some tables listed on Form 1040ES (see Appendix A). The US tax code uses has a graduated tax rate; the tax rates on higher amounts of income are higher than on lower amounts. As I calculated my tax payment, I became curious as to my effective tax rate. I am going to use Excel to duplicate a graph that I saw on the Wikipedia. My version of the graph is shown in Figure 1. Continue reading

 
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Using Excel Custom Formatting To Hide Redundant Table Information

I currently am doing some contract work as a system engineer. In this role, I am working on generating and managing lists of requirements to drive the engineering design work. The requirements are stored in a database that I query to generate requirements lists for specific subsystems, like a receiver or transmitter assembly. These requirements are disseminated to the engineers in various subsystem documents (Figure 1). Continue reading

 
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