Author Archives: mathscinotes

Estimating the Lithium Content of a Lithium Battery

Most of the products that I work on are powered by lithium batteries. Lithium batteries are popular today because they have excellent energy density but there are safety concerns with using them because there have been issues with battery fires. These fires have caused the shipping industry to impose special labeling and packaging information on their transport. I recently have needed to consider shipping batteries on airplanes, so I have been looking at the International Air Transport Association (IATA) shipment guidance for lithium-ion batteries.  These rules require knowing the amount of total amount of lithium mass present in a lithium-ion battery. This is not a number that is easy to get from the manufacturers, though I do have a number from one vendor. Continue reading

 
Posted in Batteries, Rules of Thumb | Leave a comment

US Cruiser Production During WW2

I have been working through the book Collect, Combine and Transform Data Using Power Query in Excel and Power BI by Gil Raviv – it is an excellent Power Query (PQ) resource. I particularly like the methods discussed in Chapter 10, which focused on how to make your queries robust, that is, insensitive to minor deviations in the input data. Chapter 10 spoke to me, and I immediately began looking for some practice data that suffered from common inconsistencies: headings in different cases, minor spelling errors in the data body, and inconsistent wording (example, "Co." instead of "Company"). I found that data in the Wikipedia's information on US WW2 cruisers. In this post, I will look at the production of cruisers by the US during WW2. See Figure 1 for a typical example of a WW2 US light cruiser. Continue reading

 
Posted in History Through Spreadsheets, Naval History | 2 Comments

US Submarine Production During WW2

One WW2 topic that continues to intrigue me was how US war planners kept the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) at bay long enough to build a large naval force. The key was the use of submarines for commerce raiding to disrupt the war material supply chain and tie down Japanese surface forces with convoy defense duty. This post will use Power Query to scrape the Wikipedia for this data. The Wikipedia is becoming a wonderful source for WW2 information. Continue reading

 
Posted in Excel, History Through Spreadsheets, Naval History | 1 Comment

Calculating the Pointing Angle for My Television Antenna

I spend quite a bit of time at a cabin I have built in northern Minnesota. Technically, I spend most of my time in the garage on the site and I have decided that I need to be able to watch the local television stations in Duluth. These stations are ~75 miles away and I need to determine the bearing along which to point my antenna. This seemed like a good Excel exercise that I can also use as an example for those I tutor at the Hennepin County Library. There are web calculators available that perform this calculation (example), but it is more fun doing it myself. Continue reading

 
Posted in Electronics, Excel | Leave a comment

Medal of Honor Statistics Using Power Query

In this post, I will use Power Query )PQ) to gather (aka web scrape) the US Medal of Honor (MOH) recipient names, rank, service, and conflict from a website called the Congressional Medal of Honor Society (CMOHS), which states that there have been  3505 MOH recipients. They have a beautiful website with the records stored on 140 ages with 25 names per page and one page with 5 names. Normally, I would use Python to scrape a large number of web pages but I am trying to use PQ more because my customers all have Excel. My approach as a contractor is always to work within the existing infrastructure of my customers. A copy of my workbook is available here. Continue reading

 
Posted in Excel | 3 Comments

Computing the Number of Friday the 13ths in a Year Using Excel

I have been tutoring math at the local library and using Excel as a vehicle for encouraging people to explore everyday math. While at the library, I heard a young man ask "How many Friday the 13ths are in a year?" Since I am always looking for computational examples, I showed him how to use Excel to find the answer for himself. This post shows how I taught him to solve the problem. The solution turned out to be a good example of using Excel's date and array capabilities. Continue reading

 
Posted in Excel | 3 Comments

Excel VBA Code to Center a Shape in a Cell

I recently finished a job where the customer wanted an Excel dashboard that displayed metrics for test case completion and various success metrics. This dashboard contained many control shapes that I wanted to be centered in cells. I do not like to manually adjust objects so I googled for a VBA routine that would center a shape. I soon found a nice piece of code by HipGecko on the Mr. Excel forum that centered pictures in the active cell. A simple modification of this code allows it to center shapes, an object type that includes pictures and controls. Continue reading

 
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Tensions and Angles in a Simple Rope Rigging

I have been tutoring math and physics at the local library for the last few months. As part of this tutoring, I have been looking for good graphics that illustrate basic science concepts. One common high-school physics problem involves computing the tension in ropes tied to an anchor by a pulley. Figure 1 is a graphic that nicely illustrates the tension relationship between two ropes connected to an anchor point by a carabiner. Continue reading

 
Posted in Cabin, Construction, Daily Math | 10 Comments

Measuring Countersink Angle Using Gage Balls

This post will cover how to measure a countersink angle using gage balls. Figure 1 shows how a countersink is normally specified on an engineering drawing. I frequently use countersinks in my wood and metal working hobbies. In addition, using gage balls to measure the countersink angle provides a good example of how to apply basic geometry concepts to a practical problem.  I use this example in my role as a volunteer adult math tutor at our local library. Continue reading

 
Posted in General Mathematics, Metrology | Leave a comment

US and Canada Aircraft Production During WW2

While looking for some good summer history reading, I found the book America's Hundred Thousand: U.S. Production Fighters of World War II. This book covers the production miracle associated with scaling up up the US aircraft industry to supply planes for every front during WW2. Its title refers to the fact that the US produced ~100K fighter aircraft during WW2, which lasted for 44 months for the US (Figure 2). I decided that I would look at the numbers for all forms of aircraft produced by the US during WW2. Fortunately, the Hyperwar website has put the Army Air Forces Statistical Digest online, which gives me easy access to the data. The Digest contains aircraft production data for both the US and Canada. Figure 1 shows the production numbers for the 11 categories of aircraft production listed in the Statistical Digest. In addition to 100K fighter aircraft, there were nearly 200K of other aircraft manufactured as well. Continue reading

 
Posted in History Through Spreadsheets | 5 Comments